What is the deal with watches

Mark1966

...when the General talks
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For many years, I didn't like watches. As a young, modern guy I did not see the need for them. Even a Nokia 3310 had a perfectly serviceable clock on it.

The came the realisation with age and hopefully a touch more maturity was that mechanical watches have a beauty and life of their own. There is something to be said about seeing a modern hi-beat movement near-sweep around a dial rather than the quartz beat that seems devoid of any character.

Age also started impressing on me that often it takes strapping a watch to your wrist to be taken seriously in some places, and that includes career and certain social circles also. Not so much what is on your wrist, but that there is something there. I have noted a complete difference in attitude with people that do wear watches versus those that don't and look at their phone ever 30 seconds.

A watch is also that one acceptable piece of jewellery men can ear outside of a wedding ring. It can be a constant companion and outlast 20 mobile phones while retaining the ability to show some personality which phones seem not to be able to do anymore since they mostly look the same.

Another thing I came to understand is that rather than a battery giving such a finely crafted timepiece its energy, instead I could power it with my own movement (auto) or control (in a hand-wound movement). Even mass-produced movements with accuracy to often within COSC standards (and you can regulate a Seiko NH35 to that level these days) has become something to behold. When you realise the tolerances involved in some small components being within microns in order for a movement to get down to that type of accuracy then I am proud that we have the ability to make them.

The same goes for Computer CPUs and memory literally building wires at 10-20nm diameter in silicon, 100 times smaller than a micron. Amazing we can even achieve that.

Finally, it's about enjoying the finer things in life. Purchasing quality over something designed to fail and be replaced. Solid, dependable, repairable, quality. And as we know in shaving circles, often buying vintage is one of the best things you can do.
Well said sir!

Although I admit that I've had two Seiko 5s with problem that are cheaper to replace than fix :(
 

Monsta_AU

...can I interest you in some vintage blades?
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Although I admit that I've had two Seiko 5s with problem that are cheaper to replace than fix :(
The 7S26 movements are cheap to source and are not too difficult to swap if you have the right tools. They are less-economic to fix for sure, but that is only due to their initial price being so low. I certainly don't think it is worth getting a watchmaker to fix them, but as a DIY it's worth it if you have an attachment to the piece.

Even Monsters some slightly older 'higher' Seiko models are quite line-ball on economics. They are all going up in price these days, so generally yes it is worth it since they are getting hard to find a complete unit. I am talking anything with a 6R movement, or some 4R movements. NH35 is a direct 4R36 replacement and really can be had cheap.
 
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For many years, I didn't like watches. As a young, modern guy I did not see the need for them. Even a Nokia 3310 had a perfectly serviceable clock on it.

The came the realisation with age and hopefully a touch more maturity was that mechanical watches have a beauty and life of their own. There is something to be said about seeing a modern hi-beat movement near-sweep around a dial rather than the quartz beat that seems devoid of any character.

Age also started impressing on me that often it takes strapping a watch to your wrist to be taken seriously in some places, and that includes career and certain social circles also. Not so much what is on your wrist, but that there is something there. I have noted a complete difference in attitude with people that do wear watches versus those that don't and look at their phone ever 30 seconds.

A watch is also that one acceptable piece of jewellery men can ear outside of a wedding ring. It can be a constant companion and outlast 20 mobile phones while retaining the ability to show some personality which phones seem not to be able to do anymore since they mostly look the same.

Another thing I came to understand is that rather than a battery giving such a finely crafted timepiece its energy, instead I could power it with my own movement (auto) or control (in a hand-wound movement). Even mass-produced movements with accuracy to often within COSC standards (and you can regulate a Seiko NH35 to that level these days) has become something to behold. When you realise the tolerances involved in some small components being within microns in order for a movement to get down to that type of accuracy then I am proud that we have the ability to make them.

The same goes for Computer CPUs and memory literally building wires at 10-20nm diameter in silicon, 100 times smaller than a micron. Amazing we can even achieve that.

Finally, it's about enjoying the finer things in life. Purchasing quality over something designed to fail and be replaced. Solid, dependable, repairable, quality. And as we know in shaving circles, often buying vintage is one of the best things you can do.
And now I want a watch.
 

Mark1966

...when the General talks
Staff member
Site Moderator
Grand Society
2016 Sabbatical Fail
2018 Charity Auction Winner
Joined
Apr 26, 2011
Location
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The 7S26 movements are cheap to source and are not too difficult to swap if you have the right tools. They are less-economic to fix for sure, but that is only due to their initial price being so low. I certainly don't think it is worth getting a watchmaker to fix them, but as a DIY it's worth it if you have an attachment to the piece.

Even Monsters some slightly older 'higher' Seiko models are quite line-ball on economics. They are all going up in price these days, so generally yes it is worth it since they are getting hard to find a complete unit. I am talking anything with a 6R movement, or some 4R movements. NH35 is a direct 4R36 replacement and really can be had cheap.
Good to know.

So it IS worth investing more ...
 

Monsta_AU

...can I interest you in some vintage blades?
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Good to know.

So it IS worth investing more ...
If there is an attachment to the piece, for sure. Sometimes that's worth more than money. Almost anyone that has the tools, plus the care and patience required should be able to swap out a movement. There is a trick to things, but that is what Youtube is for!

And now I want a watch.
I have a few great 'starters' coming up soon which I bought but did not bond with. Solid, easy to maintain, 300m WR, extra straps with quick-release pins so you do not need any springbar tools to swap the straps.

You do not need to spend too much to get a really solid watch.
 
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Monsta_AU

...can I interest you in some vintage blades?
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Yea but there always the temptation to over do it.
Indeed, easy to do. But when the right piece comes along and you bond with it, it's worth it.

As long as you do not spend beyond your means, all's fair in love and horology. And shaving too.
 
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