Any sparkies here that would like to comment on ceiling fans?

Discussion started by eggbert, Apr 15, 2017.

  1. eggbert

    eggbert is full of Vision Collision 2018 Sabbatical 2017 Sabbatical Da Menth Heads

    Our house is 1970s vintage, built (or rather poured) after Cyclone Tracy swept through Darwin. Houses built post the cyclone pretty much have to be concrete bunkers, and ours is no different.
    The house still has the original DM&C fans that were built in (from what I understand - wiring was placed in the formwork, and concrete poured in, over and around the wiring. But some of these fans have either failed, or are in the process of doing so.
    We are looking to replace a couple of fans, and depending on performance replace more in a year or two, but it's so confusing as to what we need to buy.

    First off, being Darwin we need fans that can move massive amounts of air. I was considering going the DC fan route, as they seem to be cheaper in the long run, especially if you use them a lot (and they are always on at full blast in whichever room people are currently in). However, I have read that these are generally controlled by a remote which I think would require extra wiring - which would mean having an ugly wiring job. Secondly (although I may have misunderstood this) the remote receiver is often placed in the ceiling void (which we don't have - because concrete). Thirdly I think there may also be an issue with raked ceilings some of ours go from 2M - 4.5M or higher - all the current fans are on extension rods, and I can't work out which current fans are viable.
    Budget is around $300 per fan (with another $150 aside for installation).
    So, any comments / recommendations?
     
  2. gthomas04

    gthomas04 ...was Drubbing's first.

    Hire a Punkah Walah?
     
    DrBob likes this.
  3. Normie

    Normie Member

    Hey @eggbert, Usually the remote receiver for a ceiling fan fits within the cup that is attached to the ceiling rather than the ceiling space.
    Also, the use of a remote means less wiring is needed, as the remote can switch both the fan and a light without cabling back to a switch.
    I'm not too sure about the DC fans, but most AC fans you can buy an extension kit for the rods and the wiring just simply plugs in with an OEM connector.
    I would assume that this will be the same with DC fans.
    As for the raked ceiling, the vast majority of fans these days are mounted to the ceiling with "Hang Sure" brackets which will allow a certain amount of angled ceiling.

    I think the only major thing with DC fans compared to AC fans that is really noticeable is when they start up.
    DC fans tend to back and forth a few times to get their momentum up, before they start spinning properly.
    Just something to get used to I guess.
    The hardest part for the sparky involved will be installing the bracket to your concrete ceiling... At least they will know they have excellent fixing!

    Good luck with the search, and I hope this clears up any concerns you have! (y)
     
  4. RazorPlay

    RazorPlay Member

    I second what @Normie said. DC Fans are much more efficient. You can also get them a lot bigger - and with an integrated LED light, to further improve the efficiency and reduce the wiring requirement. For that, you can double up on whatever wiring you have for the lights. The remote is only an improvement as far as wiring is concerned.

    Keep in mind the bigger the fan, the more efficient it is, the slower it has to spin to still move more air and the more calming it is to be around. I would love to have a room big enough for this bad boy...

    http://www.brilliantlighting.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/18515-Technical-Specs.pdf
     
  5. eggbert

    eggbert is full of Vision Collision 2018 Sabbatical 2017 Sabbatical Da Menth Heads

    9
    9X4.5m big enough?

    Thanks for the responses @RazorPlay & @Normie. The lighting setup is a bit weird here. No lights in the high part of the ceiling, just a strip of fluorescents along the wall/ lowest part of the ceiling.
    There are currently 2 fans already installed, although only one works. Guess I'll have to get a local electrician in and see if it will work.

    You reckon 2X 52cm fans would be enough?
     
  6. Normie

    Normie Member

    The remote will give you the option of adding lights to the new fans if you would like the added light. As long as the unit will fit in the room without hitting anything, and fits within your budget... The bigger the better! :ROFLMAO:
     
  7. Anakist

    Anakist Member

    I just put in two remote DC fans with LEDs.

    Instead of needing a wire run to the fan, then a control circuit from the fan back to the wall control and back to the fan, you just send power to the fan. Both of mine replaced lights, so straight onto the twin and earth of the light circuit. If you buy one with a built in remote, all the wiring is in the fan and it is just three wire hookup. If you buy a non remote fan, and a separate remote, the remote can hide between the cup and the ceiling. The remote receiver gets three wires in, then runs active and neutral to the light circuit, control and neutral to the fan circuit, and a combined earth.

    I have one Airfusion Akmani 52" with built in remote that I bought on kill tray special from Beacon, and another (maybe an Arlec?) that I got from Masters when they closed down with a universal remote kit. Basically no difference in using them but the dedicated remote is much nicer and has 6 speeds and reverse on the remote. The universal one has three speeds and I need to climb a ladder to reverse the spin direction.

    James
     

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